mikasavela:

“Virtually the only vehicles on the downtown streets of Shanghai are bicycles. Placards on light posts give readings from the thoughts of Chairman Mao, while the sign on the building on the far corner identifies it as a government department store.”
Life Magazine’s Inside China special issue, April 1971. Photo by Frank Fischbeck.
While so much has been written about the changing face of urban China, it’s still a little ironic to see these kind of photos of pedestrians, bikes and toned down commercial messages in the streetscape, as the very same things seem to be standard makings of a livable city these days.

mikasavela:

Virtually the only vehicles on the downtown streets of Shanghai are bicycles. Placards on light posts give readings from the thoughts of Chairman Mao, while the sign on the building on the far corner identifies it as a government department store.

Life Magazine’s Inside China special issue, April 1971. Photo by Frank Fischbeck.

While so much has been written about the changing face of urban China, it’s still a little ironic to see these kind of photos of pedestrians, bikes and toned down commercial messages in the streetscape, as the very same things seem to be standard makings of a livable city these days.

mikasavela:

“Virtually the only vehicles on the downtown streets of Shanghai are bicycles. Placards on light posts give readings from the thoughts of Chairman Mao, while the sign on the building on the far corner identifies it as a government department store.”
Life Magazine’s Inside China special issue, April 1971. Photo by Frank Fischbeck.
While so much has been written about the changing face of urban China, it’s still a little ironic to see these kind of photos of pedestrians, bikes and toned down commercial messages in the streetscape, as the very same things seem to be standard makings of a livable city these days.

mikasavela:

Virtually the only vehicles on the downtown streets of Shanghai are bicycles. Placards on light posts give readings from the thoughts of Chairman Mao, while the sign on the building on the far corner identifies it as a government department store.

Life Magazine’s Inside China special issue, April 1971. Photo by Frank Fischbeck.

While so much has been written about the changing face of urban China, it’s still a little ironic to see these kind of photos of pedestrians, bikes and toned down commercial messages in the streetscape, as the very same things seem to be standard makings of a livable city these days.

Posted 2 years ago & Filed under shanghai, china, streetscape, 70s, 4 notes

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